How CEOs Scare Investors

When portfolio managers take a position in a company’s shares, or even think about taking a position, it’s a highly analytical process.  But interpersonal dynamics have an impact too. When a CEO makes an investor’s Spidey sense tingle, it can derail the investor’s interest.  Here’s some ways I’ve seen CEOs get on the wrong side of an investor.

Outsized compensation. Despite prevailing sky-high compensation for CEOs, it still makes investors jumpy.  Among S&P 500 companies, the CEO’s salary has less of an impact. But among small and mid-cap companies the impact is larger.   When a CEO is making $5 million a year, the investor will register a risk that the CEO might be fat, happy and overly motivated to maintain the status quo. read more

Shelter Your Portfolio In Consumer Staples With Food, Clothing And Stellar Returns

This article was written with Oliver Pursche, the Co-Portfolio Manager of GMG Defense Beta Fund. It was part of a series of articles developed under an agreement with forbes.com to work with a variety of contributors and assist them in delivering actionable investment ideas each week. The site, forbes.com is one of the top 500 sites in the world with nearly 10 million subscribers and nearly 100 million page views a month.

Life After the Greek Elections

This article was written with Oliver Pursche, the Co-Portfolio Manager of GMG Defense Beta Fund. It was part of a series of articles developed under an agreement with thestreet.com to work with a variety of contributors and assist them in delivering actionable investment ideas each week.

Going Upstream With Annuities

This article was written on behalf of J.G. Wentworth as a by-lined article. It serves as a primer piece for so called Brokerage General Agents and was part of a broad market education initiative associated with J.G. Wentworth's launch of their Annuity Purchase Program, which offered investors liquidity for their annuities.

Fair Valuing of Portfolio Securities: Responsibilities of Fund Managers and Directors

The valuation of portfolio securities is the cornerstone of the investment management industry. Securities valuations represent a significant day to day responsibility for fund management and directors. However, market timing scandals, increasingly interlinked capital markets and a broadening of securities held in mutual funds have brought to light new thinking and new rules about the fair valuing of portfolio securities. I worked closely with professionals in Deloitte's financial services and investment management practice to help author this white paper which discusses why fund managers and trustees must now operate within a broader context and apply fair value procedures in a fund's daily operations rather than as a contingency procedure applied when the fund's board and or management believes pricing or other valuation irregularities might be present.

Trust Preferred Securities Enhance Investor, Issuer Opportunities

Changes in 1996 by the Federal Reserve Bank regarding the definition of so-called Tier 1 capital for banks unlocked new opportunities for depositories as well as investors. While the former tapped a non dilutive source of growth capital, the latter earned a yield premium, and the ability to diversify their financial services risk profile into community and local banks. This material was published first by Merrill Lynch, which was granted first rights to publication in a book about structured finance products, and was later included as a chapter in a book by investment banker Cohen Brothers & Company called Perspectives on Banking.

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